Perihelion Ship | To Paint A Bird Of Fire Album Review October 2017

Perihelion Ship | To Paint A Bird Of Fire



Label : Independent
Release Year : 2017
Country : Finland
Genre : Extreme Progressive Death Metal


Band Members

Andreas Hammer – Guitar, Vocals
Jani Konttinen – Hammond Organ, Mellotron
Jouko Lehtonen – Bass Guitar
Jari-Markus Kohijoki – Drums


Track Listing
New Sun
Bird Of Fire
The Sad Mountain
River’s Three
Wind Of No Echoes
New Sun?

Contact Links 

Perihelion Ship Official Facebook Page

Perihelion Ship Official Bandcamp Profile

Perihelion Ship Official Soundcloud Profile

Perihelion Ship Official YouTube Channel

When Opeth returned in 2011 with the release of Heritage many believed that the death of true extreme progressive death metal had come to a end due to the lack of growls to balance out the cleaner vocals. Many people did not know where a suitable replacement or a new hero band would come from or if it was going to return at all. Little did people know that one of the answers to this very question would come from Opeths neighbouring country of Sweden, Finland. The band out of Finland would be Perihelion Ship.

Last year I discovered these guys and was totally mindblown by their strong independent debut titled A Rare Thunderstorm In Spring. With haunting Hammond Organ and Mellotron style keyboards over a traditional progressive death metal sound, Perihelion Ship would be one of those very bands that kept the progressive death metal sub genre alive and well. Not only are Perihelion Ship one of the answers to that void left by Opeth, they are very serious contenders to take the throne as the kings of that brand of progressive death metal which Opeth left vacant. This could not be more true with the bands second album and sophomoric effort To Paint A Bird Of Fire.

To Paint A Bird Of Fire sees Perihelion Ship mature quite quickly within under the year since they debuted with A Rare Thunderstorm In Spring. To Paint A Bird Of Fire builds upon the rock solid foundation laid with A Rare Thunderstorm In Spring. In some areas To Paint A Bird Of Fire is quite a bit more abrasive and aggressive than A Rare Thunderstorm In Spring, especially with the guttural growls. The growls are more a blackened death vocal this time around. This will be pointed out and highlighted as this review moves forward. To Paint A Bird Of Fire has 6 very unique tracks yet they all remain in a tightly and sometimes very unpredictable objective. It is book ended by New Sun and New Sun? leaving the listener either the illusion or appearance that this could be a two part epic broke up deliberately to conveying a unspoken point. Now a few highlights from the album with a track by track analysis.

New Sun starts out as a post modern extreme progressive doom style chord progression. This is met with haunting Hammond style organs creating a very dark atmosphere that allows the deep bass chord progression to explode. The song starts to assault the senses of the listener in a beautiful brutal passage. The band always has a very cunning ability to weave in 1970’s pure progressive concepts with the mellotron and Hammond styled organs with the various modern time signatures both in the rhythm section and the guitars. This song quickly demonstrates the bands uncompromising approach to pure progressive rock and to transcribe it through the filter of today’s modern progressive metal elements. The band certainly storms out of the gate with a very tight cohesive vision and execution of sound.

Bird Of Fire begins with a very eerie dark Hammond Organ chord progression that forms a very dark atmosphere. Soon that recedes and a full all out assault of all instruments forms a deep thunderous melodic rhythm section with the clean vocal first. Thereafter the band takes the listener through a roller coaster of various time signatures and chord progressions before the death growls come in and change the complexion of the track.

The Sad Mountain opens up with thunderous blast beats that are soon met with the melancholic atmosphere created by the synths. The rhythm section goes to further and darker areas of melody in harmony with the clean yet somber vocals. The band have a uncanny ability to use the bass both as a melodic and percussive instrument. Jouko Lehtonen – Bass Guitar is gradually establishing himself as one of modern progressive metal’s best bass players. This also sees the growth and maturation of Andreas Hammer – Guitar, Vocals starting to come into his own as a powerhouse progressive metal frontman. He is also a firm reminder of a younger Mikael Akerfeldt of Opeth or Jonas Renske of Katatonia. Perihelion Ship definitely remain on point and objective this far into the album.

River’s Three opens up with a beautifully played acoustical guitar that creates a dark and once again yet somber atmosphere. Jani Konttinen’s – Hammond Organ, Mellotron orchestration of simulated wind instruments is a delightful brainstorm that yields a beautiful melody alongside the beautiful acoustic guitar. This track is a great track that it allows the listener to breathe and begin to digest the album.

Wind Of No Echoes continues to demonstrate the bands atmospheric side. Once again semi acoustic guitars alongside the beautiful keyboards give the album a particular sound signature where it is starting to become part and parcel to the brand of the band. That melancholic vibe before a wall of extreme bliss seems to be how the band likes to approach things at times. This is also accompanied with heavy rhythm section provided by the bass and drum. Then without notice the band changes up the atmosphere briefly yet with taste as not to disturb the listening experience. Through all the heavy passages there is a spoken word section that is met with some of the most venomous and sinister blackened death vocals I have heard in quite sometime. The sheer anger in the vocals is perfectly matched with the instrumental half of the track.

New Sun? This track goes well into the world of extreme progressive metal with some equally as heavy psychedelic elements to it. This is also the longest track on the album. It really explodes out of the gate with a heavy progressive and melodic unity within all the instruments. The deep rhythm sections are still in play as well as the intricate guitar chord progressions. The clean vocals are very strong on this one and are articulated quite well. If this is a continuation of the first song New Sun there are not any reprisal areas that lead the listener that way. The death growls certainly kick in perfect harmony with the deep double blast beats of the drums. The psychedelic portion comes with a wicked and sinister laugh that reminds me a lot of Porcupines Tree’s Voyage 34 when the main character Brian goes on that bad LSD trip. The mellotron style keyboards lend a heavy psychedelic vibe to those laughing spots. With this being the final track on the album it finishes very tight, professional and strong.

Last year I went on record and called Perihelion Ship’s A Rare Thunderstorm In Spring the best extreme progressive metal’s strongest debut album of all time. I also remember giving such praise to the pioneering independent spirit to that album. For a band to return just little under a year like Perihelion Ship has now done with To Paint A Bird Of Fire is another lofty feat in of itself. To Paint A Bird Of Fire is yet another full length album and it demonstrates the band’s ability to mature a lot in such little time since their debut A Rare Thunderstorm In Spring. Due to the band’s quick maturity and non inhibition of exploration I am giving Perihelion Ship’s To Pain A Bird Of Fire a strong 5/5. This could possibly be my progressive metal album of the year.

Gentle Knife I | Gentle Knife 2015 Album Review September 2017

Gentle Knife I | Gentle Knife 2015

Label: Bajkal Records
Release Year: 2015
Country: Norway
Genre: Progressive Rock/Art Rock/Folk/Eclectic Prog

Band Members

Astraea Antal – Flutes/Woodwinds and Visuals
Pål Bjørseth – Keyboards/Vocals/Trumpet
Odd Grønvold – Basses
Thomas Hylland Eriksen – Saxophone & Woodwinds
Melina Oz – Vocals
Håkon Kavli – Vocals & Guitars
Eivind Lorentzen – Guitars & Synths
Charlotte Valstad Nielsen – Saxophones
Ove Christian Owe – Guitars
Ole Martin Svendsen – Drums/Percussion
Brian M. Talgo – Samples/Words/Vocals/Visions & Artwork


Contact Links

Gentle Knife Official Website

Gentle Knife Official Facebook Page

Gentle Knife Official Twitter

Gentle Knife Official YouTube Channel

It is always often a gamble to write, record, engineer, produce and master a concept album. First you need to have a tangible plot or story-line that finds an audience or even a niche. Second you need a band or personnel surrounding you that is willing or actually shares the same vision towards the main concept or story. Many bands that fall under the progressive rock banner usually do not make a concept album on their debut. However there are exceptions to this notion.

As a matter of fact, some bands refrain from making concept albums or wait until they are many years into their recording careers with a established audience before they even introduce the world to a concept album. So when I was introduced recently to Norway’s Gentle Knife and learned that their 2015 debut album was a full blown concept album I could not resist myself and proceeded my journey with the band.

A little history into Norwegian Progressive Rock.

The usual discourse of discussion concerning progressive rock bands from Norway usually leans towards Norwegian progressive metal bands like Pagans Mind, Circus Maximus, Leperous, Borkgnar, Enslaved, etc. In reality there is a whole other community within the Norwegian progressive rock scene that is sometimes overlooked due to the greater progressive metal and black metal exports that come out of this beautiful Scandinavian progressive outpost. Bands like Airbag, Magic Pie, White Willow, Wobbler, Pictoral Wand, Gazpacho and the subject of this review Gentle Knife have also solidified Norway’s place on the global stage of progressive rock.

Gentle Knife are made up of 10 very different yet interesting members that make up the beauty of the sound of the band. These are 10 very unique personalities that really have developed a well cohesive unit both as a band and in their vision into the album creation process. The vocal narrative of the band is carried by both a masculine male perspective so articulately done by Håkon Kavli – Vocals & Guitars and the feminine female perspective eloquently done by Melina Oz – Vocals. The entire concept is about a urbanite wanderer that ventures into the vastness of the forest and gets lost.

The sound of Gentle Knife can be described as very traditional symphonic progressive rock that is rooted into the purity of 1970’s progressive rock with influences of Genesis, Van Der Graf Generator, King Crimson, Amon Dull ii and Renaissance with a modern 21st century twist to it with bands like Magenta, Kingfisher Sky , Mostly Autumn and IONA to name a few. The very fact the band has 10 members makes for quite a very interesting orchestral unit in of itself. There are so many possibilities with more members in a band compared to a typically standard four or five members that seems predominant within the progressive rock community.

Gentle Knife even open up vast possibilities due to three dynamics working in union within the band. These three dynamics are a very beautiful stringed section along with a beautiful on time rhythm section with the well balanced blend of woodwind instruments serving as a base for the band. Gentle Knife’s Gentle Knife 2015 has eight uniquely crafted tracks. I will talk about some of the major highlights going on with track by track analysis.

Eventide is a immediate invitation and intimate look into the ability of the band as a core unit. It comes out on a full cylinders with a deep rhythm section matched by the intensity of the woodwind’s and stringed section. The band automatically begins to show both its technical and melodic prowess all in one time. The band firmly establishes both roots in 1970’s progressive rock and displays the evolution of progressive music to modern standards in their own distinctive way. The deep rhythm melodies along with the woodwind sections takes the track into a level of layers upon layers.

The female vocal narrative and male vocal narrative certainly give the song two different dimensions allowing for the listener to warm up to the story lyrically. The 10 person dynamic continues to amaze the listener with layers that are very unpredictable always bringing something new with every spin of the album.

Our Quiet Footsteps opens up with a deep drum to bass rhythm section with a beautifully well executed Hammond Style organ to compliment the rhythm section. Soon layers upon layers of Gentle Knife’s signature woodwind sound enters into it and takes the rhythm and stringed sections to a entirely different dimension. The band really executes these layers in a perfect balance where all instruments are easily digested by the listener. The band clearly have a great insight to create ‘Pure’ progressive chord progressions and passages that do in fact open up possibilities between the older progressive purists and even newcomers to the progressive lifestyle. The woodwind portions of this particular track remind me a lot of Camel meets White Willow. Mina Oz’s vocal is both beautiful and angelic that works perfectly in harmony with the male masculine narrative. I like how the band executes certain elements of isolation within the vocal narratives where everybody’s vocals can be heard and felt.

Remnants Of Pride is a more keyboard stringed atmosphere in the early seconds of the song. Soon after the beauty of the male vocal comes in with such storytelling clarity. The melody and harmony are always very balanced. The male vocal is met in spot on harmony with the female vocal where the band performs this with a more symphonic orchestral approach. This is the kind of track the band will be able to attract more attention from the audience in live sets. Another unique thing this track has going for it are its odd time signatures both in the woodwind and vocal harmonies that add to its mystique.

Tear Away The Chords That Bind is a much more heavy prog induced track. The rhythm section is much deeper and heavier. The vocal is done with abstract filters much like it is pumped through a megaphone. The bass serves as a more percussive instrument in various spots to lend to the heavy prog atmosphere the band creates on the album. By the time this track comes into the arrangement the band really tighten up in the rhythm sections allowing for both the stringed and woodwind portions to really breathe and shine through. The woodwind’s serve both as 16th Century Renaissance and current jazz fusion style passages.

Beneath The Waning Moon is a another track that serves as full validation of the bands intricate understanding of well written rhythm sections with beautiful wind instruments. There are a lot of elements going on here that make it nearly impossible to compare to other bands or albums. Gentle Knife clearly are establishing their very own distinctive sound by now. A sound that can only be noted as the Gentle Knife sound.

The Gentle Knife truly begins with a heavy stringed section with a beautiful keyboard and deep off step rhythm section that all come together in melody and harmony to anchor the track into a beautiful composition piece. The vocals between the female and male narrative continue to add a layer of elegance and grace to the song. This is one of the few songs where a full guitar and keyboard solo are distinct and can be heard. The absolute interchange between all the instrumental portions is a beautiful testament of the band’s understanding of melody.

Epilogue Locus Amoenus begins with a beautifully orchestrated Hammond style organ with some vintage 1970’s fuzz to it. Even in its vintage sound it is not dated and still stands up to modern progressive rock elements. The guitar comes in as well and has a more center stage appearance about it. This is the most atmospheric track on all levels. At around the 3:45 mark the guitar takes on a flamenco style that is very unexpected but very interesting. This is met with a very smooth and eloquently performed saxophone in harmony to the instrumental. This track continue to explore the depths of where the band can and does go.

Coda Impetus begins with a late 1960’s psychedelic groove laden passage with big bass and drums along with a Hammond style organ and a modern style keyboard. This is a track that builds layer upon layers of various rhythm sections met with equally deep rhythm sections from the guitar’s. In its simplicity this track offers a very complex and intricate look into another layer of the bands instrumental prowess. The saxophone laden jazz sections are a thing of ‘Fusion Genius’.

For a debut album this was one of the most ambitious and thought provoking I have heard in quite sometime. People kept mentioning this band to me all through 2016 and after this I know what the hype was all about because this debut lived up to it. This is a first of two from me concerning Gentle Knife. The next is Gentle Knife II Clock Unwound. I give Gentle Knife Gentle Knife a 5/5.

To Be Continued & Concluded With Gentle Knife II Clock Unwound






Gentle Knife II | Clock Unwound Album Review September 2017

Gentle Knife II | Clock Unwound 

Label: Bajkal Records
Release Year: 2015
Country: Norway
Genre: Progressive Rock/Art Rock/Folk/Eclectic Prog

Band Members

Astraea Antal – Flutes/Woodwinds and Visuals
Pål Bjørseth – Keyboards/Vocals/Trumpet
Odd Grønvold – Basses
Thomas Hylland Eriksen – Saxophone & Woodwinds
Veronika Hørven Jensen – Vocals
Håkon Kavli – Vocals & Guitars
Eivind Lorentzen – Guitars & Synths
Charlotte Valstad Nielsen – Saxophones
Ove Christian Owe – Guitars
Ole Martin Svendsen – Drums/Percussion
Brian M. Talgo – Samples/Words/Vocals/Visions & Artwork

Contact Links

Gentle Knife Official Website

Gentle Knife Official Facebook Page

Gentle Knife Official Twitter

Gentle Knife Official YouTube Channel

Track Listing

Prelude: Incipit (Instrumental)
The Clock Unwound
Fade Away
Plans Askew


It is always a very curious anticipation when a band releases a second album. The term ‘Sophomoric Jinx’ always enters the conventional discourse. This is so especially true when the band puts out a very ambitious and colossal debut album. This is exactly what Gentle Knife did in 2015 with their debut. The typical cliched comparisons always come into the conversation along with a much higher expectation. The band has safely avoided all these cliches and stereotypes with their second album Gentle Knife – Gentle Knife II – Clock Unwound.

Gentle Knife are now made up of 11 very different yet interesting members that make up the beauty of the sound of the band. Veronika Hørven Jensen – Vocals has replaced Mina Oz for this run of Gentle Knife. However that takes nothing away from the vocal quality within the female narrative. If anything it adds more depth to the band. Although it may have a hint of being a conceptual piece, this album this time around has more of a common theme to it instrumentally. The band also returns with a greater maturity to the songwriting process, the production and growth as individual musicians. The six tracks that make up the album are a true testament of a band growing and maturing. Now for a track by track analysis into this ‘Orchestral Labyrinth’ known as Gentle Knife – Gentle Knife II – Clock Unwound.

Prelude: Incipit (Instrumental) opens up the album with a beautiful piano that works in harmony with the trumpet. This combination brings about almost a very ‘Baroque’ style about it displaying influences from Handel, Bach or even Vivaldi style registers within this opening composition. This track also allows the listener to get settled in for the remainder of the album.

The Clock Unwound transitions very seamlessly and smoothly from Prelude: Incipit (Instrumental) with a elegant opening guitar solo. Immediately the saxophone and other woodwinds, along with the a heavy prog guitar, begin to establish a very unique and signature sound for the band. Soon a thunderous drum/bass rhythm section enters in with more a tuned down chord progression. The male vocal comes into the narrative and seems filtered through a megaphone. The keyboards are of a more modern style, however playing perfectly on time with both the stringed section and rhythm sections. The woodwind instruments add total depth and layers to the composition as well. The band certainly knows how to hook a listener and keep their attention for the duration of the track. The female vocal narrative gives the track a very heavy hint of RIO or (Rock In Opposition) / Avant Prog vibe with the way it appears diminished in the composition and structure. The band even plays well with off rhythm section time signature beats on this track as well. Towards the end of the song their is a beautiful eclectic mix of jazz fusion with the alto saxophone and progressive chord patterns.

Fade Away starts off with a semi electric guitar in a atmospheric isolation before the flute comes in and adds a beauty and depth to the song. This opening instrumental works on perfect time to the isolation of both the male and female vocal narrative. The horned woodwind sections remind much of Gentle Knife’s peers Thank You Scientist where there is a huge and beautiful cacophony of various stringed. rhythm and horned sections all in perfect harmony making the track a trek into the spirit of the listener.

Smother comes in with a very up tempo rhythm section that is soon met with a overlaying atmosphere created by both keyboards and other woodwind instruments. The female vocal narrative comes in in perfect time with the drums and the male vocal follows in suit shortly after adding more vocal depth to the song. This song is lyrically about somebody’s best intentions and trying may not be the best for them. From here there is a beautiful jazz style chord progressed passage with the female vocal carrying much of the middle of the song. This is all rounded out with a neo progressive keyboard enabling such a atmosphere.

Plans Askew opens up with a vast pastoral acoustical folk styled guitar that sets the tone for the composition. The vocal sounds both isolated yet in harmony to the instrumental. The woodwind instruments alongside with the rhythm section opens up and sets the heavier more up tempo portions as the song progresses. Throughout the track the bands steadily builds layers upon layers towards a plateau before transitioning onto different chord progressions that would lead to a beautiful duet between the male and female vocals.

Resignation has much of the same instrumental narrative to it. This instrumental narrative starts out with a big rhythm section that increasingly builds as the track moves forward. The track adds layer upon layer with the various instruments that the individual musician brings to the table as a collective. This track also is arranged perfectly as the final song on the album. Although the song seems steeped in melancholy, it still has a smooth instrumental backdrop. It is that backdrop that allows the lyrical content done through spoken word.

For a sophomoric effort this is a masterpiece. Gentle Knife have now firmly set themselves up to be a major progressive rock unit going forward for the next 10 to 15 years. Clock Unwound will be looked at as one of those pivotal albums that will be talked about in the evolution of progressive rock 15 to 20 years from now. Due to the band’s continuous maturity I am giving Gentle Knife II Clock Unwound a 5/5.

Nad Sylvan | The Bride Said No | Album Review September 2017

Nad Sylvan | The Bride Said No


Label: InsideOut Music
Release Year: 2017
Country: Sweden
Genre: Progressive Rock


Band Members

Nad Sylvan – Lead Vocals/Electric & Acoustic (5) Guitars/Keyboards/Piano (5) Orchestrations (4,5,8) Pogramming (7) Poducer & Mxing

Additional Musicians

Tania Doko – Lead (8) & Backing (2) Vocals
Jade Ell – Lead (1,2,5,8) & Backing (4,5,7,8) Vocals
Sheona Urquhart – Lead (1,2) & Backing (4,5,7,8) Vocals/Saxophone (7)
Steve Hackett – Guitars (5-8)
Guthrie Govan – Guitar (5)
Roine Stolt – Guitar (6)
Anders Wollbeck – Keyboards & Programming (3)/ Orchestration (6)/Sound Design (1,2,4,8), co-producer (1,3,6)
Tony Levin – Chapman Stick (3,7)/ Upright bass (5)/ Electric Bass (7)

Jonas Reingold – Bass (2,4,6,8)/ Guitar Riff (4)
Nick D’Virgilio – Drums (2,4,6,8)/ Percussion (2)
Doane Perry – Drums (3,5,7)
Alfons Karabuda – Waterphone (3)


Track Listing 

1. Bridesmaids (1:17)
2. The Quartermaster (5:38)
3. When The Music Dies (7:00)
4. The White Crown (6:15)
5. What Have You Done (8:29)
6. Crime Of Passion (5:59)
7. A French Kiss In An Italian Cafe (5:58)
8. The Bride Said No (12:26)
– silence (2:00)
9. Black Sheep – hidden track


Contact Links 

Nad Sylvan Official Website

Nad Sylvan Official Facebook Page

Nad Sylvan Official Twitter

Nad Sylvan Official YouTube Channel

InsideOut Music Official Website

InsideOut Music Official YouTube Channel

A person of unconventional and slightly strange views or behavior.



Exceptional intellectual or creative power or other natural ability.


During his tenure with Genesis in the later 1960’s to early 1970’s Peter Gabriel was looked at the world over as being a bit odd, strange, different, theatrical, weird and even eccentric. With his choice of outfits on stage, to his public persona, Peter Gabriel could not escape the stereotypes that are mentioned above. Another thing Peter Gabriel was notorious for was his absolute genius with the creative side of the progressive rock and entertainment business.

After his departure from Genesis, Peter Gabriel began to really change into something else. This held totally true with the invention of MTV where Peter Gabriel had an era full of many field days with his video presentations. Some of MTV’s most notorious and strange videos came from Peter Gabriel with the likes of Games Without Frontiers, Shock The Monkey, Solsbury Hill and his juggernaut Sledgehammer. The fact that the world got to see this Eccentric Genius at work was a privilege to the world over. Over the years Peter Gabriel would tone down such presentations and focus more on the musical aspect. This left a void in progressive rock/ art rock until Nad Sylvan came along, thus the Eccentric Genius has come in a different individual. This also would shape his image and sound going into another great progressive rock band Nad Sylvan fronted and that being Agents Of Mercy.

Nad Sylvan is a bit of a Eccentric Enigmatic Genius in the fact he really marches to his own distinctive vision and beat. Nad Sylvan is like the ‘Second Coming’ to Peter Gabriel. This is probably why Steve Hackett has invited Nad Sylvan on stage on many occasions to perform early Genesis material with The Steve Hackett Band. However as much as he is a reminder of Peter Gabriel, Nad Sylvan also has his own thing going for him and it certainly shines through with his latest offering The Bride Said No.

The Bride Said No is a continuation of his last album Courting The Widow in 2015. The story picks up where the female character is at in her relationship with her potential suitor/husband. This time with The Bride Said No, Nad Sylvan certainly explores much darker subject manner with both the instrumental part and the lyrical vocal part. The Bride Said No is also a little shorter and to the point than Courting The Widow was. Throughout the album there are many things going on and I will point these highlights out going forward.


Bridesmaids is a opening instrumental with special effects to simulate the ocean crashing on to the shore. We already see the female character second guessing or getting cold feet perhaps. The effects and instrumental are done wonderfully here.

The Quarter Master transitions seamlessly with perfect timing from Bridesmaids. This song also displays a very dark side on the album and of Nad Sylvan’s creative prowess. The heavy Hammond style organ already gives this song a deep layer of sheer darkness and conflict within the narrative of the lyrical content. The dark portion from the Hammond Organ also adds a deep layer inside the bass/drum rhythm section. The guitars work on both the stringed section and the rhythm section equally throughout the song. There are effects of people chanting here as well. On the vocal and lyrical narrative the song talks about the adventures into the night of a drunk in the masculine form. The instrumental displays the drunken sailor and his emotions and point of view perfectly. Soon a female vocal comes in as a female character explaining to the narrator specific warnings on the drunken man.

When The Music Dies is a bit of a departure within the concept. It has the appearance of a brief intermission. This incredibly soulful track is a dedication to all the great progressive rock giants we lost over the last few years. The song is written in such a way that it could become a possible single. This is also written, recorded and mastered in such a way as to have some appeal for those who are not really into this brand of progressive rock. The instrumental sections alongside the lyrical sections present a warm inviting atmosphere of reflection to the listener.

The White Crown begins with a beautiful eclectic intro that comes in the tradition of early Genesis, especially the Foxtrot and Trespass eras. This track also ventures into the ‘Heavy Prog’ territory with a much heavier and darker chord progression that is met with a deep Hammond style organ and heavy 1970’s style progressive rhythm sections. By this point on The Bride Said No the listener starts to see that this epic story explores the darker emotions and the instrumental and vocal certainly adds much towards those darker emotions. There is a part where the synth’s go out into a more psychedelic area. The irony is that in all the dark instrumental sections, Nad Sylvan’s voice always remains as a positive optimism about it. This part of the story lyrically is one of heartbreak and introspection.

What Have You Done starts out with a beautiful piano and keyboard in perfect melody within their respective isolation on the engineered intro. Soon another layer of isolation appears in form of Nad Sylvans eccentric angelic vocal. This song can constitute as a ballad easily. The slower and lighter aesthetic allows the album to breathe and the listener more time to soak in and digest the album. The listener is able to look backward on the story and anticipate that latter half of the album. There is some beautiful guitar work on this one from Steve Hackett and Guthrie Govan. The special effect of a choir on here adds another layer of beauty to the composition.

Crime Of Passion opens up with a angelic atmosphere of a choir once again. Soon the track starts to rock on all cylinders with the deep rhythm sections and guitars. This track brings together elements of 1970’s original progressive rock with 1980’s neo progressive rock with very current and modern elements. With all those elements happening this song would hold up in any decade of progressive rock. This song lyrically has the male character in the story start to really question himself in relation to his potential bride. The instrumental half of this perfectly supports this introspective emotion.

A French Kiss In A Italian Cafe starts out with Tony Levin leading with a beautiful stand up bass with the drums. Soon the isolated vocal of Nad Sylvan shines through where the story can so eloquently be told. This track is very heavy in the rhythm section. It is this rhythm section that adds layers of beauty and layers of atmosphere to maintain the attention of the objective listener. The drum plays heavily off the snare on this one moving it forward with great continuity and grace. Sheona Urquhart lends a very beautiful Saxophone in the closing moments of the track.

The Bride Said No starts with a intro that is slowly faded in through world class engineering. One again the opening is very heavy on the on rhythm with a beautiful bass and snare lead drums. This is the first time in the story on the narrative we experience actual dialogue between the female and male characters. Sheona Urquhart & Jade Li has such a Kate Bush style of beauty in her vocal that perfectly compliments Nad Sylvan’s male narrative. Although they really love one another the male and female characters they come to the realization it may be better to depart and go their separate ways for their own personal reasons. The instrumental side to this has beautiful Hammond style organs and guitar solo’s that give the song the epic countenance it truly is. Instrumentally the track ends on a very positive and uplifting note.

After Courting The Widow and now its companion The Bride Said No I truly believe that Nad Sylvan has some very pivotal here. Please go back and listen to Courting The Widow first and then The Bride Said No will make better sense. These projects have great potential to be live classics. I certainly hope Nad Sylvan does perform both of these in their entirety live someday with some CD/DVD Bluray treatment. Through emotion and top notch musicianship The Bride Said No is on its way to becoming a ‘Prog Classic’. With The Bride So No, Nad Sylvan has established himself as a force to be reckoned with. I give Nad Sylvan’s The Bride Said No a 5/5.

Signum Regis | Decennium Primum Album Review August 2017

Signum Regis | Decennium Primum


Label: Independent
Release Year: 2017
Country: Slovakia
Genre: Progressive/Power/Melodic Metal


Band Members

Mayo Petranin – Vocals
Ronnie König – Bass/Backing Vocals
Filip Koluš – Guitars
Ján Tupý – Keyboard/Backing Vocals
Jaro Jančula: – Drums


Track Listing
Decennium Primum
Unfold The Mystery
Damnatio Ad Bestias
Screaming For Justice
Kingdom Of Light
The Future King
Well Deserved
Thunder And Rain
Train To Neverland
A Psalm Of Life


Contact Links 

Signum Regis Official Website

Signum Regis Official Facebook Page

Signum Regis Official Twitter

Signum Regis Official YouTube Channel


Writers Editorial Note

This particular review is in dedication of the lives lost and property damaged in South and South-East Texas USA due Hurricane Harvey. This album has many encouraging and uplifting messages. Trust me I went through Hurricane Harvey as well.

Power Metal has allowed and afforded many bands the true liberty of writing about just anything from a lyrical perspective. On top of its sheer majestic aesthetic instrumentally it allows the band a direct storyboard to its intended audience. This is why many power metal bands are booked during the European Metal Festivals, such as Wacken Open Air, High Voltage or Keep It True, in summer. The bands write such anthems that the audience does not only digest but actually sings those anthems back to the bands delivering them. This holds more truth and conviction when the songs have a deeper meaning of faith, political issues or just issues about life. This has held true for about a decade for Slovakian power metal powerhouse band Signum Regis.

In a area that has seen much upheaval and tribulation since the birth of The Roman Empire and Christianity over 2000 years ago through imperial conquest and barbaric bloodshed to being utterly dictated by modern Nazism and later Communism, comes a band that has been a light and beacon of some of the most uplifting and encouraging power metal for a decade plus. This being Signum Regis. Instead of swelling on their dark past they choose to use Jesus Christ and Christianity to bring hope to a otherwise turbulent world. Their brand new independently released Decennium Primum, which is Latin for The First Decade, brings this type of positive emotion to a world that seems to be fracturing before our very eyes.

Decennium Primum is one of those albums that grow on a person the more they listen to it. Even power metal fans that subscribe to more of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy subjects or the horror and science fiction subjects that dominate the genre. Decennium Primum articulately explores subjects of the Old Testament and 1st Century AD Christian church. Although not a ‘Concept Album’, there is still a common thread or theme throughout the album. Decennium Primum is also the band’s fifth official studio album. Signum Regis come in the same vein of other Christian based power metal bands like Narnia, Golden Resurrection, Theocracy and Teremaze. However Signum Regis still have their own unique distinctive sound that keeps them from being clones of those bands I just mentioned. Decennium Primum is a total brilliant example of that. Now a inside look and highlights from every track on Signum Regis Decennium Primum .

Decennium Primum is basically a opening instrumental that serves as a very smooth and seamless transitional track to the following track Unfold The Mystery.

Unfold The Mystery is a straight away speed power metal track. It has very fast straight away traditional power metal riffs that are celebrated in the genre. The double blast beats and deep bass also set the tone for a fast yet coherent chord progression. The band start to establish high harmonies in the vocal. The lead vocal alongside the power metal atmosphere allow the lyrical content to breathe and shine through. The rhythm guitar and lead guitar interchange with very cunning timing. The guitar solo’s are also blended with beautiful atmospheric endorsements.

Damnatio Ad Bestias explodes with monstrous and blistering chord progressions both on the stringed sections and the rhythm sections. Mayo Petranin – Vocals reminds me of a cross between Jorn Lande and Russell Allen. His vocal certainly has a bite about that fits the instrumental quite well. The rhythm guitar and the lead guitar certainly develop a melodic relationship in regards of the composition. This track demonstrates the bands ability to make their point and move forward without the typical grandstanding that is often associated with progressive/power metal.

Screaming For Justice opens up with a little bit darker instrumental that shows the band’s heaviness. The band continues the beautiful display of harmony and how it perfectly compliments the melody within the instrumental. The band is starting to really establish the vocal harmonies as a major factor on the album with this track. They continue to remain spot on with their objective. The lyrical content is very uplifting giving light within the dark instrumental aesthetic. Filip Koluš – Guitars is becoming a one man twin attack on the guitar.

Kingdom Of Light opens up with a brief powerful guitar solo. That is followed by a break where the vocal is allowed to be spot-lighted where they can start to pull the listener into the story of the lyrical content. The break has a beautiful acoustic guitar creating a atmosphere that serves as a anchor for the track. This is all accompanied by deep rhythm section chord progressions. This track is also well written enough to be a single. It pops out like that. Plus the solo’s keep changing as to not bore the listener. All the instruments are allowed to breathe so the listener can hear every one distinctively.

The Future King explodes out of the first note with a deep groove laden rhythm guitar chord progression. Then the equally deep rhythm section melody comes in beautiful harmony with the stringed section. All of this blends very well to uplift the beautiful harmony vocally. The band continues with their very positive lyrical content. This is another track that would work as a single along with the previous song Kingdom Of Light.

Well Deserved opens up with another thunderous instrumental passage. The guitars are well tracked along with the rhythm section. The bands message continues on point with a spiritual message. The chord progressions are very brooding. The band displays its progressive side very heavily on this song. It does have a beautiful bass/drum rhythm section done so eloquently by Jaro Jančula: – Drums and Ronnie König – Bass/Backing Vocals.

Thunder And Rain opens up with a beautiful A-capella choir with the chorus first. This continues to display to the listener that the band will not be pigeonholed into the typically fast power metal opening. This track also opens up with a very anthemic consistency that is very celebrated in the progressive/power metal genre. The opener comes into the tradition of a band like Blind Guardian. Soon the song takes on familiar characteristics power metal territory. Fast blast beats and bass anchor the song while the stringed sections and vocals can provide the hook to reel in the listener. Once again even with only one guitarist in the band, Signum Regis overdubs the track deceptively allowing for there to be a appearance of a twin lead guitar arsenal.

Train To Neverland opens up with a very proper train sounding effect. From there it blisters the listener with high vocal harmonies that are carried by both the stringed section and deep bass/drum rhythm sections. This track has a very traditional quality in as much as there is the verse/bridge/chorus, that is sometimes lacking in the progressive power metal communities. The guitar solo’s and bass/rhythm sections keep the album grounded and on point. This also applies with the lyrical content.

A Psalm Of Life is the final song on the album. It opens up like a guitar players delight with the anthemic opening chord progression passage. This is a fast thought straight away power metal track. This song brings in all the personality that has been demonstrated with this album. There are some Iced Earth style rhythm guitars working on this one. The harmonies remain on point showing the bands ability to keep the attention of the listener. This is also properly the final arranged song on Decennium Primum.

I have admired Signum Regis from afar for the last 7 to 8 years. They are certainly a band that will continue to uphold the this type of progressive/power metal. They are also one of the many pillars of this brand of music. The band also knows how to keep the attention in a way where the listener has no acceptable reason to become bored or not interested in the product itself. On all those points above I am giving Signum Regis Decennium Primum a 4.5/5.

Cormorant | Diaspora Album Review August 2017

Cormorant | Diaspora


Label: Independent
Release Year: 2017
Country: USA
Genre: Progressive/Doom/Death/Black Metal


Band Members

Nick Cohon – Guitars
Brennan Kunkel – Drums/Vocals
Matt Solis – Guitars/Vocals
Marcus Luscombe – Bass/Lead Vocals


Track Listing

Preserved In Ash
The Devourer


Contact Links 

Cormorant Official Facebook Page

Cormorant Official Twitter

Cormorant Official Bandcamp Store Profile

Cormorant Official YouTube Channel

Cormorant seem to be a Melodic Three-Headed Beast with three very distinctive personalities in the progressive black metal community. First personality of this Three-Headed Beast is doom metal. Cormorant has certainly honoured the true essence of heavy metal with its doom metal element. They have incorporated the sound of early Black Sabbath with other doom metal pioneers such as Trouble, Candlemass, Witchfinder General, Kyuss, Solitude Aternus, TYR and Electric Wizard.

The second personality and head of this beast is that of Black Metal. The Black Metal personality reflected on here is a balance between the First Wave Of Black Metal or FWOBM. and Modern or Norwegian Black Metal. The bands reflected within the Black Metal personality are Venom, Bathory, Hellhammer with the more modern Black Metal of bands like Satyricon, Enslaved, Darkthrone, Emperor, Ihshan and Agalloch.

The third and final headed personality lies within both progressive rock and progressive metal. Within the personality of progressive rock it is more 1970’s based with some influences of King Crimson, Emerson Lake & Palmer, Frank Zappa, Mahavishnu Orchestra and Uriah Heep. The progressive metal influences that complete the Progressive head and personality are bands like Rush, Opeth, Gojira, Savatage, Voi Vod, and Tool. Therefore the band has a very deep well into which to draw from.

The deep well of all those influences I just mentioned above certainly do come through on Cormorant’s Diaspora. First of all as many who follow this particular brand genre of progressive deathy black metal know that when Opeth discontinued using growls and Agalloch finally called it quits it left a void in the community. A band like Cormorant is a band that totally redeems that quality of progressive metal with the their own perspective on it. Second Cormrorant understand the demand of that genre brand of progressive metal and absolutely have a endless supply of various elements that make up that brand of extreme progressive black metal and I will point that out throughout this review. Cormorant’s Disapora also demonstrates progressive rock/metal’s continuous vast growth into many areas of hard rock, post rock and heavy metal. Now a look into the four tracks of Cormorant’s Disapora.

Preserved In Ash begins with a blistering bombardment of serious double blast beat drums and deep bass rhythmic tones. Soon a brutal low fi guitar chord progression enters in alongside the brutal blackened death growls. The lead blackened vocals are executed pitch perfect by Marcus Luscombe – Bass/Lead Vocals and are met in perfect harmony with the death growls executed perfectly by Brennan Kunkel – Drums/Vocals and Matt Solis – Guitars/Vocals. There is also a dual guitar dynamic where there is the low fi black metal style of guitar that is met in melody and harmony with the 1970’s style lead progressive doom chord progression. This demonstrates the bands ability to execute various guitar styles at once allowing for various melody and elements into the music without overwhelming or boring the listener with something that sounds like the same thing over and over. The rhythm section anchors the dual guitar dynamic into a tight cohesive chord progression that serves as a steering element to the track. Around the 4:00 mark the track tunes down a bit. There is certainly a method to the bands sheer madness on the opening track that starts to set up the duration of the album. Around the 7:30 mark the band really takes the track into a very abyssic tuned down chord progression exchange with solo’s trading back and forth. When the death growls finally come back in they are more of a deathy doom metal style.

Sentinel continues to bruise and blister the senses of the listener. This track opens up with a slant towards My Dying Bride, Novembers Doom and early-Anathema meets a Morningrise and Blackwater Park era’s Opeth. The guitars and rhythm sections are really tuned down with sheer brutality alongside the deep pounding death growl that plays perfectly off of the rhythm section that anchors the track. This is another epic clocking in at 15:51. Their is a harmonious exchange of both death growls and black metal screams before the track takes a Trouble doom metal style chord progression instrumentally with a Emperor style of black metal scream. The track takes on some progressive groove metal laden rhythm progressions that move it along seamlessly. The fact that the band have a dual guitar brings a lot of rhythmic depth to the track. There are also some clean vocal harmonies in and out as the song progresses.

The deep bass/drum section is seriously in the tradition of Trouble, Candlemass and Paradise Lost with a later-Enslaved and later-Carcass style vocal. There are parts where the twin guitar sound a DEATH Leprosy and Symbolic era’s with how they exchange various chords and riffs. Once again you have both a black metal vocal and a death metal style of vocal interchanging off and on of one another. About the 7:00 mark the track takes on some heavily semi electric semi acoustical guitar chord progressions that remind me a lot of Agalloch’s 2002 classic The Mantle. These guitar sections are engineered so smoothly with layers upon layers of various harmonious progressions that create tightly knit passages. These guitar progressions are rooted heavily into 1970’s progressive rock as well. The clean vocals remind me a lot of Opeth’s Face Of Melinda off of Still Life.


The Devourer is a blistering track that reminds me a lot of Opeth’s My Arms Your Hearse era progressive death metal. This has a heavy respect in the tradition of Demon Of The Fall. The death metal style growls remind me a lot of ex-Morbid Angel vocalist/bassist David Vincent. This track is the shortest track on the album at only 7:50. It is still full of killer quality progressive up tempo riffs and deep bass/drum backbone in the rhythm section. The blackened metal vocals has a heavy Darkthrone influence. The clean vocal sections are serious Candlemass meets Cathedral influence.

Migration is a 26:00+ epic that completely comes in the tradition of a Agalloch’s Faustian Echoes meets Opeth’s Black Rose Immortal with a twist of Averse Aubes Cendrées. It opens up with heavy guitar atmospheric and percussive effects. It is not very long before the track goes into a more progressive and blistering direction. The deep doom style chord progressions plus the death metal growls really give you the appearance of a true brooding track that assaults the listener’s senses evey which way. The way the band stretches out the first minutes of the track certainly is a commentary on what the band’s main objective is on this track.
Migration works in three major stages that carries the listener into a brutal epic journey of various doom, progressive, black and death metal elements. The exchanges between the death metal growls and the black metal screams seem to be a signature sound for the band. They certainly give the band a distinct and unique sound in a genre of music that most people continue to misunderstand. It is in that misunderstanding that Cormorant bring a sense of sheer clarity even to the outsider to this music.
The band has a point in the track where they really create a bleak and dark atmosphere with just some heavy acoustic guitars and percussion portions. The acoustical portions remind me a lot of Agalloch’s The Mantle meets Opeth’s Damnation with a 1970’s Alan Holdsworth/Robert Fripp twist. The 1970’s elements have been really heavily induced throughout the duration of the album and shows the band’s utter respect for the progressive side of the album. From here the band builds layer upon layers with various blistering chord progressions and brutal passages. The band continue the groove laden and low fi based guitar riffs blended with more traditional death metal and doom metal riffs.

Cormorant are certainly a band that will keep progressive doom laden black metal alive on some level.It also helps their cause to be independent without utter bondage to a prejudice of a record label. Disapora is a true testament that quality progressive black metal has a lengthy shelf life. After going back and listening to every album before this, Disapora is a album that is the next step in the natural evolution of the band and the genre. For the sheer open maturity of Cormorant’s Disapora I am giving this a 5/5 and it is a strong contender for Album Of Year 2017

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