TRANSATLANTIC announce ‘The Final Flight: Live at L’Olympia’ for release February 17th, 2023

TRANSATLANTIC – the Prog Supergroup of Neal Morse, Mike Portnoy, Roine Stolt & Pete Trewavas – are pleased to present a new concert set entitled ‘The Final Flight: Live At L’Olympia’. It was recorded and filmed in France on the last stop of a tour to promote the band’s fifth and most audacious album to date, ‘The Absolute Universe’. This was the multinational group’s first outing in eight years.

Watch the band performing ‘Owl Howl’, a highlight from ‘The Absolute Universe’ album, here: 

Released in February 2021 to unanimous praise, ‘The Absolute Universe’ came in two alternate formats; an abridged 64-minute record known as ‘The Breath Of Life’, and a companion piece entitled ‘Forevermore’ that added a further four songs, clocking in at an hour and a half. Though the foundations of both were shared, each format featured lyrics and music independent of the other.

However, when Transatlantic finally hit the road they opted to perform a third format of the album, a full-bells-and-whistles, 96-minute Blu-ray culmination of both takes known as ‘The Ultimate Edition’ that had been released in 5.1 surround sound. Following that segment of the show Transatlantic took a short intermission and returned to the stage for a rollercoaster trawl through the remainder of their lavish catalogue. From the first note of ‘Overture (The Absolute Universe)’ through to the medley based around the first two Transatlantic albums that closes the evening, the performance comprised 3 hours of music in total.

“Ever since the start of this band we have played for three hours, so that’s something we’re all used to,” states drummer Mike Portnoy, who grins whilst describing his own experience as “butt-numbing”. However, Roine Stolt is ready to admit that this time felt very slightly different.

“It was a great tour,” acknowledges the guitarist and multi-musician, “but when you include our spot at Morsefest [where besides performing ‘The Absolute Universe’ the band also revisited their 2009 album ‘The Whirlwind’ and revised a cover of Procol Harum’s ‘In Held (’Twas) In I’ that had featured on their debut from 2000, ‘SMPTe’] I felt the challenge of learning, or re-learning, three-and-a-half hours of music before leaving Sweden. Now that I am getting slightly older, I was a little worried about playing for that long – it requires a lot of concentration: ‘Is this one in 7/8 or 9/8? Maybe we’ll play it in 13/8 and in a different key?’ But of course, once we got out there onto the stage, those thoughts went straight out of the window.”

With a chuckle, vocalist and keyboard wizard Neal Morse reveals that as the tour found its feet Transatlantic threw an additional curveball. “We started playing songs slightly differently to the way you’ve heard them on ‘The Ultimate Edition”, he grins. “So what you get with this live album is similar, but essentially it’s a fourth version [of the record]. When you play live, from night to night it helps to keep things fresh by jamming a bit and changing things up as you go. There are a few examples of that, for instance, the beginning of the last section that starts with ‘Belong’ is quite different than the record – partly because we couldn’t remember it! So we made up a new structure.”

“We’re always as well prepared as we can be but in a way Transatlantic is kind of a show band” points out bassist Pete Trewavas. “Playing alongside Mike who is a powerhouse on the drums, there is this raw power. If he wants to raise the energy that’s what we do. We’re all taking solos here and there, though we get the songs across we’re all showing off as much as we can”.

Filmed by Paul Green (who also shot their ‘Whirld Tour 2010: Live in London release), and mixed by longtime collaborator Rich Mouser, this set will be available as a Special Edition 3CD+Blu-ray Digipak (incl. 5.1 surround sound) & as a Gatefold 180g 4LP release. Both feature artwork by Thomas Ewerhard & photos by Nidhal Marzouk.

Pre-order now here: https://Transatlantic.lnk.to/TheFinalFlight-LiveAtLOlympia

Tracklisting:

1. The Absolute Universe Intro

2. Overture

3. Reaching For The Sky

4. Higher Than The Morning

5. The Darkness In The Light

6. Take Now My Soul

7. Bully

8. Rainbow Sky

9. Looking For The Light

10. The World We Used To Know

11. MP Intro

12. The Sun Comes Up Today

13. Love Made A Way (Prelude)

14. Owl Howl

15. Solitude

16. Belong

17. Lonesome Rebel

18. Can You Feel It

19. Looking For The Light (Reprise)

20. The Greatest Story Never Ends

21. Love Made A Way

22. The Whirlwind Suite

23. NM & RS Intro

24. We All Need Some Light

25. The Final Medley

Line-Up (on this recording):

Neal Morse – Keyboards, Acoustic Guitar & Vocals

Mike Portnoy – Drums & Vocals

Roine Stolt – Guitar & Vocals

Pete Trewavas – Bass & Vocals

With:

Ted Leonard – Guitar, Keyboards, Percussion & Vocals 

TRANSATLANTIC online:
https://www.transatlanticweb.com/
https://www.facebook.com/TransatlanticMusic/
www.instagram.com/transatlanticofficial
www.twitter.com/transatlantic99

INSIDEOUT MUSIC online:
www.insideoutmusic.com
www.youtube.com/InsideOutMusicTV
www.facebook.com/InsideOutMusic
www.twitter.com/InsideOutUSA
www.insideoutmusic.store
http://spotify.com/progrockessentials

Nine Skies – NEWS: New album ‘The Lightmaker’ teaser and story unveiled

Following the success of their acoustic album ‘5.20’, Nine Skies announce their new concept album ‘The Lightmaker’ with a magnificent teaser and the story.

The Lightmaker tells the story of Rudy, who is now living in 1001st and final life. 

The album retraces some of his existences through the view of several characters and the introspection of these various incarnations which undoubtedly encourage reflection on the human condition.

Style: Frogressive Rock

Country: France
Artworking © Steve Anderson
Release Date: Coming in 2023

FOLLOW NINE SKIES

https://nineskiesmusic.com
https://www.facebook.com/nineskiesmusic

Leon Alvarado – Charging The Electric Dream Featured Video

Leon Alvarado releases Charging The Electric Dream, the first official music video from the upcoming album of the same name due to be released worldwide on December 15th, 2022 by US Progressive Art-rock label Melodic Revolution Records.

Charging The Electric Dream is Alverado’first new album in six years and features seven new tracks clocking in at just under 40 minutes.

About Leon Alvarado
Leon is an artist and composer who has recorded with an impressive list of musicians such as Rick Wakeman, Bill Bruford, Trey Gunn, Billy Sherwood, John Goodsall, and Jerry Marotta among others.

When not making music, Leon is a successful graphic designer and illustrator who has worked for many record labels, and concert promoters and occasionally works directly with bands. Among the distinguished artists that Leon has done work for are: Jethro Tull, Yes, Jeff Beck, Phil Collins, Peter Gabriel, Brand X, Deep Purple, John Entwistle, King’s X, The Australian Pink Floyd Show, and many more.

Leon sees both his graphic work and his musical output as part of a greater picture that encompasses all of his disciplines within the arts.

For fans of Brian Eno, Vangelis, Tangerine Dream, and Jean Michel Jarre.

Previous Releases
Launch Overture (Alternate Edit) – 2016
The Future Left Behind – 2016
Persistence – 2015 
2014 Music From An Expanded Universe – 2014
Strangers In Strange Places – 2014
Plays Genesis and Other Original Stuff – 2019

Follow Leon Alvarado
MRR Profile Page: https://mrrmusic.com/project/leon-alvarado/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/leonplays/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/leonalvarado80/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/leonalvarado

Melodic Revolution Records Online:
Website: https://mrrmusic.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MelodicRevolutionRecords/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/MelodicRevolutionRecordsMusic
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/melodicrevolutionrecords/
Bandcamp: https://myrevolution.bandcamp.com/


Interview with Steve Freight/Author Voyage 35: Porcupine Tree

It is hard to imagine, in this era of everybody being permanently connected, that there was a time not so long ago when it was hard to find out information on your favorite band, especially if they were not on the charts. Hence the advent of fanzines, which were bloody hard work for those involved (I ran Feedback for 16 years, more than 80 issues and 11,000 pages of print), yet they are now an invaluable source of information for diehard fans and researchers alike. Those who were dedicated to just one band often gained massive access and contain information that has never been made available elsewhere. Such is the case of Voyage 35, a fanzine dedicated to Porcupine Tree. Between 1995 and June 2001 Steve Freight put out 14 issues dedicated to his favorite band, and he has now lovingly collated these into a book that has just been released by Gonzo Multimedia. He made the decision to collate the fanzines, so each issue appears as a separate chapter, with the cover art and images which appeared within. However, he made the call not to include reviews and items which looking back add no value, so what we have here is a distilled version, which for fans of the band is indispensable. I was asked if I would like to interview Steve and jumped at the opportunity as there were way too few people running fanzines, and those who have taken the time and energy to now make them available in book form even more so.  

When did you become interested in music, and what bands were important to you at the time and why?

My mother had a large selection of classical 78s and from an early age around 2, I was allowed to play them. Whilst I could not read I used to make up sounds to go with the music and could recognize the tunes from the labels and the shapes of the words.

The radio used to be on most of the time and growing up in the 60’s I was lucky enough to be exposed to all the pop songs the BBC would play (not much due to needle time) on getting my first radio aged 7 (1963) I found Luxemburg and listened via my headphone (just the one for one ear) under the sheets. This reminds me of visiting a great aunt who asked my mother if I had a hearing problem as she thought my trannie and headphone was hearing aid!

The first real influence was….

Cliff Richard. From there I liked Buddy Holly, and then the Beatles. She Loves You was hanging on the tree for me at Christmas.

The first single I bought with my own money was Legend of Xanadu.

Up until senior school, I was probably into more pop-orientated music but even in those days, this consisted of the Beatles, Stones, The Who, The Moody Blues, and Pink Floyd who have stayed with me to this day and helped forge my musical tastes. I was also lucky that bands I got into released singles in those days. Bands like Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, and The Doors were all chart entries too. Heaven.

Then a truly remarkable single assaulted my senses. Hawkwind’s Silver Machine. Loved it and bought it, but a strange thing then happened. I was more captivated by the B side, 7 by 7. Intrigued a friend and I went to see them at the Edmonton Sundown on 29th December 1972. Little did I know that I was witnessing history in the shape of the Space Ritual tour. The next day I went out and bought Doremi Fasol Latido with my Saturday job money and I’ve bought everything released since.

As to what I listen to these days, it’s an eclectic mix of 60’s pop when the radio is on, Hawkwind, Pink Floyd, Charlie (Love Terry Thomas’s sense of humor in the lyrics – check out Popstar), Moody Blues, The Beatles, Fish on Friday, The Who, Free, Bad Company, Ozzy, Alan Parsons, The Doors, Meatloaf / Jim Steinman related, Glen Campbell, Lindisfarne, Yes, Rumer, anything with Paul Heaton (my wife’s favorite) and early, pre In Absentia, Porcupine Tree.

How did you discover Porcupine Tree yourself?

There was a shop in Southend, where I was working, called 99th Floor that I used to visit during my lunch hour and chat with John and Tom. They would always be playing records by bands I had little knowledge of, and one day Tom said he had something he was sure I’d enjoy that had just come in. It was the Voyage 34 single. I bought it on the spot and also On the Sunday of Life

What made them stand out for you?

I think it was the sheer variety of genres that was attempted on “Sunday” that made it a joy to listen to. It covered so much of the music I had grown up with and was a throwback of sorts, but with a “progressive” twist. I later said in the fanzine that we should call it Evolving Rock. And then when Radioactive Toy came on when listening for the first time, wow what a song.

What was the scene like back then? Were you interested in other progressive bands, how did you go out about discovering information?

Trance and sampling were big things then and Voyage 34 seemed to fit this mold quite well. Until I spoke to Steven on the phone for the first time, I always assumed that the start was a Pink Floyd sample from The Wall and he seemed surprised by this and said it was all him. He said that if it was reminiscent of The Wall it was purely unintentional. I was going to many concerts back then, mostly rock orientated, which I was enjoying more than Prog at that time.

Prog was though, very derivative, and I tended to stick with what I liked, such as Floyd and Yes. It’s a cliché, but so many bands wanted to be (early) Genesis, but I found them hard to get into, so the subculture of Genesis clones didn’t do a lot for me. I used to rave about the early Porcupine Tree albums to anyone who would listen to me, and Guy Thomas was one of these.

The lucky so-and-so was able to go to Porcupine Tree’s first live gig at the Nags Head Wycombe and as someone who has videoed a fair number of Hawkwind concerts over the years, he contacted Richard Allen and was able to get a pass to video the concert officially (yes a full video of this gig exists). For me, this led to my introduction to the band members.

Why did you decide to write your own fanzine? How did it come about? How big was the first issue (pages) and how many did you print?

I had been helping Doug Smith (Hawkwind manager) to promote the Alien 4 album, by taking flyers and posters around the local record shops in my area. My reward was a backstage pass to the Brixton all-nighter.  Porcupine Tree was also on the bill and had an early 30-minute slot. Somehow, our (mine and Guy’s) backstage passes morphed into access to all area ones (don’t ask)!

Guy had transcribed the Nags Head gig onto a broadcast-quality videotape, and he wanted to get this to Steven. We negotiated the corridors of the Academy looking for the band’s dressing room. Finding this we went in and had a chat with them. I remember mentioning Steven’s bum note played on the Radio One Session for some reason, but Steven said these things happen and he wasn’t worried by it and that if he was he wouldn’t be putting it out on record. All four were pleasant even though we had crashed their dressing room and I then thought I’d contact Richard Allen and see if anyone had approached the band regarding a fanzine.

At the time my wife worked evenings, and once I’d put our daughters to bed I listened to music or tinkered with making my own mash-up videos, nicking bits from films or TV shows and overlaying them with Hawkwind music. I used scenes from Bladerunner and set this to It Is The Business Of The Future to be Dangerous, Legend I set to Magnu and Danger Man (US Secret Agent) to Secret Agent, among others. I sent copies to Dave Brock and when I met him years later at the Take Me To Your Leader launch party he asked if I was the guy who had set Danger Man to Secret Agent. He’d have liked to have used it, but it was a copywriter’s nightmare!

With all this free time I felt I could produce a fanzine and Richard agreed if Steven was OK with it. He said he’d get Steven to call me. He did but I wasn’t expecting the call at 11:30 at night! We spoke for around 30 minutes and some of this I recalled in the first issue. Putting it together was not easy for the first few issues as I used my trusty writer program on the Atari, and these were initially printed out on my Dot Matrix printer. Before they went to print though I found thanks to my work IT department, they could convert this to Word Perfect and master pages were printed.

I then had to cut and paste the photos into the required places and then photocopy and reduce them from A4 to A5 master. Very time-consuming. Then came the photocopying.  I used my work resources out of hours on the first couple of issues and then my in-laws said I could use the printing facilities at their church for a charitable donation, which was how the later issues were done.

The first issue was 24 pages and I sold them at concerts and gave many away to promote the fanzine and the band. 99th Floor in Southend had a supply they sold or gave away. In all 14 issues were produced, but by the last issue around 30 were produced on a print-by-order basis, as the fan base now got their information much quicker via the internet. 

What were the reaction of the band, label, and other fans?

Richard Allen was pleased with the fact he had something to help promote the band with. He sent out flyers with his Freakbeat mail order business mailouts and I got a very good response from this too and had a mail list of over 100 for issue 2. Steven found a couple of minor errors in the first issue and offered to proofread all future issues and agreed to himself and the other band members being interviewed for future issues. These are all in the book.

How did the book come about?

The book came about by accident. I had not intended to publish it. I had however thought about consolidating the articles and interviews into one document for my own benefit and to pass on to anyone who was interested. I’d seen some old Voyage 35’s selling on eBay for over £20 an issue, so thought there might be some interest as a historical document in the early days of the band. 

Rich Wilson, Charles Beterams, and Guy Tkach, had all contacted me for information for their books on Porcupine Tree and this gave me a push to provide this to them. 

Coincidentally, my wife was in the process of leaving her employment and with very little to do took on the task of typing up the articles from the early issues I had no digital files (those produced on the Atari or which had been on floppy discs). I made a conscious decision not to include reviews of the albums including my own as there were many reviews out there and most are personal opinions. Once I’d consolidated the articles I sent this out to friends and some contacts I still had from the old Fanzine days. This included Jon at Gonzo.

Jon felt this had potential as a published book and he would run with this and do the necessary, which is where we are at today. The one thing I wanted though was the Mutant Baby inspired by Radioactive Toy and drawn by John Chase as the cover illustration.

The book still has very much a fanzine feel, including being broken by issues. The approach works very well but why did you choose this format?

It just seemed logical to keep the issue approach as it gave a sense of historical progression on the evolution of the band at the time. I thought that anyone wanting to see what was being said about saying The Sky Moves Sideways at the time of release could easily find the references within the book.

All music reviews are subjective to a lesser or greater degree, and given that, yours would have captured a moment in time do you regret not including them?

Not really. I did as said, consider including them but in the end, decided to leave them out. Maybe in hindsight keeping them in would have added to the historical nature of the book that I intended.

After Voyage 35 did you still write, or did you put that behind you?

I occasionally did reviews for other fanzines such as Brian Tawn’s HawkFan, Hawkeye, and Wondrous Stories, and did a booklet, primarily for my daughters, but it has gone a bit wider over the years, on my memories of Ventnor on the Isle of Wight, covering my childhood years. I’ve not written anything for some while now though.

Apart from Hawkwind, who really excites you musically today?

There is not a lot of new music I get overly excited about these days. Fish On Friday is probably the “newest” band I really enjoy listening to, along with Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds (never really that keen on Oasis though). Other artists I have gotten into seem to run out of steam quite quickly and get derivative or lose their way. It’s as if they have a lot of good ideas and put them into one good debut release. I’m forever donating CDs to charity shops that have disappointed me. Most CD purchases (and yes, I prefer to own the music and I think they sound better than streaming) these days tend to be remastered or new material by bands I collect.

I see you have covered Steven’s output other than Porcupine Tree. How did you track down these bands?

Once I did the first issue Steven’s past came to light from various readers, including a live tape that Steven didn’t have in his possession. These readers had been lucky enough to live in Steven’s area and had seen previous bands he had played in. Also, Steven had issued tapes with these bands.

No-Man was of course already well known and a number of people who were fans of this band transitioned across to Porcupine Tree. It was always my intention to cover Steven’s offshoots and one issue became a No-Man special, covering a timeline and all known releases up to that time. Phil Harwood helped with the discography whilst I researched the history as best I could. 

The only time I deviated from the straight Issue approach in the book, was in bringing forward a letter from Tim Bowness that I published in the next issue as I felt it better to keep the No-Man info together.

What are your thoughts now that Porcupine Tree has reformed for a new CD and Tour?

I’m pleased for them (although disappointed for Colin (and Chris) that they missed out on this stage of the band’s popularity). They went out on a high with the Royal Albert Hall gig, but that was also tainted as there were obvious tensions within the band and they just faded away. Personally, I didn’t enjoy the latest album, and having seen the set list there wasn’t enough from the early years to satisfy me, but again, I’m pleased with the recognition they have finally achieved from all corners of the press, even those that ignored them in the early days. 

Playing to sell-out crowds across the globe justifies the direction Steven eventually took, even though it left me (and others) behind. I am proud of the part I played in those early formative years in helping promote the band and pleased Richard Allen (the band’s first manager) took the time to write the forward to the book for me. 

I hope people who buy the book find it an interesting testament to those early days and will be inspired to revisit the early albums and see what inspired such loyalty from the fans at the time in Porcupine Tree.

What’s next?

Who knows? 

Steve’s book is available at all good outlets, and can easily be found on all Amazon sites – here is the link to the UK, https://www.amazon.co.uk/VOYAGE-35-Porcupine-Steve-Freight/dp/1908728957/

Jonas Lindberg and The Other Side release cover of Spock’s Beard classic “The Good Don’t Last”

Swedish progressive rock outfit Jonas Lindberg and The Other Side released their latest album Miles From Nowhere earlier this year to critical acclaim.  Now, while busy working on new music, the band has recorded a cover of the Spock’s Beard classic “The Good Don’t Last”.

Listen to the track here:

Jonas Lindberg had this say about recording the track:
“It was fun to make a cover version out of a song that I love and have listened to so many times! It was also a challenge to make it sound different and like our own version, since I knew the song inside and out already.”

The track features Jonas Lindberg on bass, keyboards, guitars & backing vocals, Joel Lindberg on lead guitars, Jonas Sundqvist on lead vocals, Jonathan Lundberg on drums, and Nicklas Thelin on acoustic guitars, percussion & lead guitar on “The Radiant Is”.

https://jonaslindbergotherside.lnk.to/TheGoodDontLast-CoverVersion

Jonas Lindberg had this say about recording the track:
“It was fun to make a cover version out of a song that I love and have listened to so many times! It was also a challenge to make it sound different and like our own version, since I knew the song inside and out already.”

The track features Jonas Lindberg on bass, keyboards, guitars & backing vocals, Joel Lindberg on lead guitars, Jonas Sundqvist on lead vocals, Jonathan Lundberg on drums, and Nicklas Thelin on acoustic guitars, percussion & lead guitar on “The Radiant Is”.

Watch the videos for the singles from the album here:
 
“Secret Motive Man”:
https://youtu.be/hFLHsaLXqug
 
 “Why I’m Here”:
https://youtu.be/tkGNuyF1wg4
 
“Oceans of Time”:
https://youtu.be/RDTir86qNdU
 
 “Little Man”:
https://youtu.be/jGg5iJiNt6Q

“Quality on all fronts and a joy for fans of symphonic prog”
Prog Magazine
 
“The album consistently impresses and excites, and it will undoubtedly
form a valuable part of any melodic progger’s collection.”
The Prog Report
 
“A triumph of pomp and circumstance, overblown and bloody brilliant!”
Prog Radar

Miles From Nowhere is available as
Ltd. CD Digipak, Gatefold Black 2LP+CD+LP-booklet, and Digital Album here:
https://jonaslindbergotherside.lnk.to/MilesFromNowhere

‘Miles From Nowhere’ consists of seven songs which spans the full range of the progressive rock landscape – from the soaring ”Summer Queen” (led by Jenny Storm), to the folksy instrumental ”Astral Journey” to the closing title track; a sprawling 25 minute epic which features none other than Roine Stolt (The Flower Kings, Transatlantic) on lead guitar.

Jonas Lindberg & The Other Side online:
https://www.facebook.com/jonaslindbergotherside
http://www.lindbergmusic.com/
https://www.instagram.com/jonaslindbergofficial/
https://open.spotify.com/artist/4cQCLwSvoMEWrtSvneDZBT?si=wWjo-GQrTu6UM6tPGEeqWQ

INSIDEOUT MUSIC online:
www.insideoutmusic.com
www.youtube.com/InsideOutMusicTV
www.facebook.com/InsideOutMusic
www.twitter.com/InsideOutUSA
www.insideoutmusic.store
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